Tag Archives: ephemera

Old Stuff

Old Stuff

Archives has been cleaning out old junk from their office. They leave it outside the door with a “free” sign, for people to take. I periodically wander by to see what’s on offer. One day it was a giant box of hanging file folders (excellent score for the genealogy stash!), another it was a bunch of engraving plates, and most recently, it was a large, crumbly roll of old posters. I didn’t realize they were all the same poster when I took the entire roll, but that’s okay. They’re interesting and will be a nice addition to the collage stash, when I finally get them home.

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Found

I have no idea who this kid is, but I love her.

I have no idea who this kid is, but I love her.

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So long as we love

A page from a 1938 autograph book belonging to a 7th grade girl.

So Long as We Love

“So long as we love we serve; so long as we are loved by others, I would almost say that we are indispensable; and no man is useless while he has a friend.”
“Stevenson”

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1886 Autograph Album

1886 Autograph Album

IMG_6862

A coworker found this in a drawer she was cleaning out. She thought I’d like to look at it, so she brought it to work. I got permission from her to scan, transcribe, and upload the entire album, so that other people could look at it. It might be of use for genealogical research.

The album belonged to Mr. James Thomas Ricketts, a teacher at the Yorktown School, in Yorktown, Tippecanoe County, Indiana. Most of the entries are from 1886, with a few later ones in 1890. Yorktown no longer exists. It was de-platted in 1969. All that remains is a cemetery.

I’m finished transcribing all the entries, but I’ve only had time to do a few cursory look ups in the Census records. The entire album can be seen here.

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The Stash

Old Photos

Old Photos

I ordered these from an Etsy seller. In total, 185 photos for $35 plus shipping (which was cheap). I’ve only taken a quick shifty through them, but they look to be mostly from the same family. Lots of WWII era photos. Lots of vacation photos. LOTS AND LOTS of picnic photos. A project is taking shape in my mind.

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Broadway Deluxe Cab Co.

Broadway Deluxe Cab Co.

I found this in an old book. I hope Randy got his head back, polished and working better than ever.

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Vintage Ad

Retractable Lead
Newspaper ad for a retractable lead, 1941

“Smart dog owners carry leashes wound on spring reels. The leashes encased in Tenite are styled in lustrous colors to match almost any costume. By simply pressing a small switch on the handle, the dog may be controlled at any desired distance. Tenite will withstand rough handling without denting or chipping.”

Just in case you thought retractable leads were a relatively new thing. Who knew?!

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Unknown Union Soldier

Unknown Soldier

This tintype of an unidentified Union soldier was in a box of photos at my mom’s house. I believe it came from my ex-step-father’s family.

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Woman and Child

CDV06
Carte de visite, 4 x 2 1/2 inches, H. Eilmann, Flensburg.

At first glance, I thought this woman looked dead. She certainly looks odd. I think part of it is the paleness of her irises. The curling of her hands also seemed strange, but after looking at other portraits from that time, it’s clear that this was a common pose for women. Even so, the position of her left arm, behind the girl, seems stiff and awkward. It’s not a conventionally “pretty” portrait, but I think it’s an interesting one.

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WWII Letters

I’ve been working on putting together a mini-website for the letters I got from my aunt. I’m conflicted about them. On the one hand, they’re an amazing little time capsule from World War II, but on the other, there’s a lot of racist language in them that I’m not comfortable with perpetuating. I think, though, that the letters’ historical value outweighs the racism (and other -isms I’m sure I’ll encounter as I work on transcribing them).

I also have trouble with the glorification of killing and the military industrial complex, so it’s difficult for me to warm up to “characters” who inhabit that world. I believe deeply in the importance of pacifism; war is never the answer. And so, the whole project is problematic for me for a whole lot of reasons. That doesn’t mean I don’t think it’s worthwhile, though.

War Letters

At this point, my plan is to just transcribe the letters. I don’t think I’ll scan them and put the images online, though I do want to include any items contained in the envelopes (photos, newspaper clippings, etc.).

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