Morning Sky

Northwest Sky at Sunrise

Northwest Sky at Sunrise

I missed the sunrise, but I caught the pink afterglow in the northwest sky.

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Bedtime Police

Bedtime #dogs #boxerdogs

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I was up past my bedtime. Pretty sure Thomas issued demerits. Baby boy hates it when I stay up late.

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The Mothership Has Arrived

The Mothership Has Arrived

I, for one, welcome our new alien overlords.

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Rain

Dreary Day #rain #clouds #fall #autumn #sky #indianaskies #iu #indianauniversity

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We needed the rain, and it eventually turned into a beautiful day.

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October Morning Sky

Northern Sky at Sunrise

Sunrise Over Wright Quad

Another well timed mosey to the coffee maker, which included a walk by the windows. I didn’t think we’d get much of a sunrise this morning, because it was cloudy, but I was wrong.

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October Sunrise

Sunrise Over Wright Quad

It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood. Perfect dog walking weather this morning (mid-50sF), and critters are active. We saw deer and a fox today.

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Sleepy Bear

Sleepy Bear #dogs #boxerdogs

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It’s past Thomas’ bedtime. He turns into a pumpkin at 9pm. He’s so tired that he can’t even be bothered to complain at the neighbor dogs barking outside.

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Great Disorder

The pages are in great disorder.

You can’t say they didn’t warn you.

Baptisms Aglish (Castlebar) Parish 1845
Diocese of Tuam, Parish of Castlebar, Baptisms Jan. 2, 1838-April 17, 1855
Castlebar | Microfilm 04214 / 02 / page 1
Image from NLI

This is how these two facing pages appear on the National Library of Ireland website. That’s where I originally viewed them, and that’s where I originally downloaded them from.

Baptisms Aglish (Castlebar) Parish 1845
Diocese of Tuam, Parish of Castlebar, Baptisms Jan. 2, 1838-April 17, 1855
Castlebar | Microfilm 04214 / 02 / page 79
Image from NLI

And this is how they appear in the FHL films at FamilySearch. First, the left-hand leaf, which corresponds to the left-hand leaf below.

Baptisms Aglish (Castlebar) Parish 1845
Diocese of Tuam, Parish of Castlebar, Baptisms Jan. 2, 1838-April 17, 1855
FHL film 007732604 image 1695

And now the right-hand leaf, which corresponds to the right-hand leaf below.

Baptisms Aglish (Castlebar) Parish 1845
Diocese of Tuam, Parish of Castlebar, Baptisms Jan. 2, 1838-April 17, 1855
FHL film 007732604 image 1731

I believe this is what kids these days call a hot mess. According to WorldCat, FHL created their films in 1984. NLI didn’t digitize their microfilms until 2010, but I can’t find any indication on their website of when they filmed the registers. Was it before or after FHL? And who touched the volumes in between? This volume and a couple of others are in such a mess that it’s sometimes impossible to tell what year an event happened in.

I really want to smack whoever is responsible for the “great disorder.”

Let this be yet another reminder that it’s important to cite where you viewed the image, because all images of a given document are not necessarily identical to one another. Different institutions may have filmed an item independently, and clearly those differences are sometimes more than just cosmetic.

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Reality Check

John Basquinn in 1920 United States Census
1920 U.S. census, population schedule, Manhattan Assembly District 16, New York, New York, enumeration district (ED) 1127, sheet 11A, p. 243 (hand written), dwelling 16, family 290, John Basquinn; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com/ : accessed 17 Sep 2017); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T625, roll 1214. Rec. Date: 8 Oct 2016

Here’s another tip: Before disregarding a record because it has the wrong name on it, consider if that name makes any sense. Basquin/Basquinn is not a name you’d find in Ireland. It simply doesn’t exist. If you search the Irish census records, you won’t find the name, period. If you search Ancestry globally for basquin* born Ireland, you will find a handful of records, all of which are either transcribed incorrectly or you can see that an enumeration mistake was made and the country of origin was France.

For example: In the 1860 US census there’s a Kate with no last name given, born Ireland, working in New Orleans as a servant in the home of a French family named Basquin. I’d bet money her name was not Basquin, but whoever the informant was had no idea what her surname was and likely didn’t care. She was just a servant, right? Then when the record was transcribed, the blank was interpreted to mean that her name was Basquin, too.

So. Here we have John Basquinn, born Ireland about 1873, living in New York City, and working as a construction laborer. I guarantee you this is Walter Basquill and Mary McHugh’s son, John. How his name was recorded as Basquinn will remain an eternal mystery.

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Ancestry’s Image Enhancement

Manifest from Ancestry with Enhanced Images Turned On

Manifest from Ancestry with Enhanced Images Turned Off
“Pennsylvania, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1800-1962,” database and images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com/ : accessed 17 Sep 2017), manifest, Westernland, 29 Oct 1906, roll 54, image 316, line 6, John Basquill. Rec. Date: 22 Sep 2017.

I posted this in one of my genealogy groups, but I’m going to repost it here as a general warning, using John Basquill again.

This was prompted by an earlier discussion in one of my genealogy groups on images at Fold3 vs Ancestry, and how the Fold3 images were darker and, to some eyes, contained less information. I stated at the time that the opposite was true, and that I’d recommend turning off image enhancement at Ancestry, because you can lose valuable information if you don’t. Here’s an example.

One image with Ancestry’s image enhancement turned on (top), and one with it turned off (bottom). If you leave image enhancement turned on, you’d never know that there were contract ticket numbers in the left column of this manifest. You may not find those numbers important, but I’ve been able to use them to track an individual (and in the process fill in knowledge gaps) through multiple manifests where she failed to board the ship. Some of those manifest entries are crossed out, but the information in them helped me connect her to two different sisters living in the US and also to the townland she came from, which led me to her birth register entry and her parents’ names. All because I noted the contract ticket number and used it to collate several manifest entries.

The image on top may be prettier, but it is missing valuable information.

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