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Baptismal Register 1873, image from FamilySearch
image from FamilySearch

Baptismal Register 1873, image from Ancestry
image from Ancestry

Roman Catholic Church (Ireland), “Diocese of Tuam, Parish of Aglish (Castlebar), Baptisms 22 June 1872 to 28 Dec 1880,” page 9, number 3, John Basquill baptism 6 Jan 1873; FHL 007732604, image 2105; National Library of Ireland, Dublin. Rec. Date: 1 Apr 2016; Sponsors John Cannon and Bridget Cannon

I’ve been working on this guy all day. John Basquill was the half-brother of my great grandma, Nell Basquill. He was born in 1873 in Hollyhill, Ballyhean Civil Parish, County Mayo, Ireland. I’ve got him fairly well traced (still missing the 1930 and 1940 censuses), but it’s been nagging me that the image I had from the baptismal register had part of the baptism date obscured. That image originally came from National Library of Ireland (also used by Ancestry and Findmypast).

It occurred to me that I should check the images at FamilySearch. They aren’t indexed, but if you know what you’re looking for–and I do*–then it’s pretty easy to find the image you want. I did, and lo and behold, they lifted the torn interior corner of the page to image it, revealing the full baptism date: 6 Jan 1873. But then if you look at the place of birth on the FamilySearch image, that’s obscured. You just can’t win. But at least, with both images, you can get at both pieces of information.

So that’s the lesson for today: it pays to check multiple collections to see if they have independent images of a document.

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*If you look at the citation, you’ll see the FHL number and an image number. If you go to FamilySearch, search the catalog, and plug the FHL number into the fiche search box, you’ll find the film containing the image. Then just plug the image number into the image number box, and you’ll be taken directly to the above image.

FamilySearch

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Shadow

All Photos-31

I have no idea what was casting this shadow on my wall, but it was kind of lovely.

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Mistakes Were Made

Martin isn’t one of “my” Basquills, but it still frustrated me that I could not find the image for his birth registration. It was indexed by FamilySearch and the entry is available there and on Ancestry: volume 19, page 583.

The page has been indexed at irishgenealogy.ie. Like FamilySearch and Ancestry, the index says the entry is on page 583. It’s not, though. There is no Martin Baskfill on page 583. I had to page through, forward and backward, to find him, but I finally did. he’s on page 593. I submitted a correction to irishgenealogy.ie, but there’s no way to submit a correction to Ancestry. The best I could do was to leave a comment on the page and hope that anyone else frustrated by the missing entry will find it.

If there’s a way to submit record corrections at FamilySearch, I can’t find it, so that one will have to linger. I did at least do some clean up in the FamilySearch tree for this family. That was a hot mess. There were several duplicate entries, and it took me nearly an hour, but it’s done. And I attached the birth register index source at FamilySearch to Martin and added a warning that the page number is incorrect. Hopefully people will click through to view the tree entry for him, if they search for the birth register entry there.

Martin Baskfill

Martin Baskfill

Martin Baskfill
Ireland General Register Office, Health Service Executive, Civil Registration Service, Register of Births, volume 19: page 593, number 168, Martin Baskfill; digital image, “Register of Births, District of Westport, Union of Westport, County of Mayo,” IrishGenealogy.ie (https://www.irishgenealogy.ie/: 10 Sep 2017). Rec. Date: 17 Sep 2016.

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Catch!

Oh, nothing, just throwing food at my dog. #dogs #boxerdog #boxerdogs

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Sometimes I throw food at my dog.

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Ear of Judgment

Who knew one little dog could pack so much judgment into a single look? Judgeface, ear of judgment, and epic side eye.

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Wants a PBJ

#droolingbegface #pbj #dogs #boxerdogs

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Even his drooling is ridiculous.

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Bridget Agnes Groarke 1869-1954

Record of Aliens Held for Special Inquiry
“New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” online images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com/ : accessed 26 Aug 2017), manifest, Arabic, 21 Jan 1905, microform serial T715, 1897-1957, roll 529, page 31, Bridget Basquill, line 10. Rec. Date: 15 Oct 2016.

1940 United States Census
1940 U.S. census, population schedule, Troy Hills, Morris County, New Jersey, enumeration district (ED) 14-89, sheet 42B, p. 3360 (stamped), B. Basquill; digital images, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com/ : accessed 26 Aug 2017); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T627, roll 2373. Rec. Date: 8 Oct 2016; Inmate, married, 64 years old, born Ireland, naturalized.

Bridget Agnes Groarke was born 28 Oct 1869 in (as far as I can make out deciphering the handwriting) Cloonacannana, County Mayo, Ireland. She married James Basquil, the son of John Basquil and Mary Haran, on 19 Feb 1900 in the Catholic Church at Swinford, County Mayo. On 13 Feb 1902 their only child, Patrick John, was born in Lisheenabrone, County Mayo.

Those are the dry facts. For some as yet unknown reason, Bridget and her son emigrated to the US in 1905 and settled in Newark, New Jersey. Her sister, Catherine, had married a man named Fred Hymers, and they also lived in Newark. Surely there was more to the story that just that, though? Bridget followed through on all the steps to naturalization and took the oath of allegiance on 11 Dec 1933. In her naturalization paperwork, she says that her husband, James, resides in Darlington, England. What happened between them? As far as I can tell, they had no personal contact after she came to the US.

I have so many questions! When Bridget and Patrick arrived here, they were detained because Bridget had no money with her, despite there being a notation on the ship’s manifest that she possessed $5. Bridget is on line 10 of the first image, and you can see the notation L.P.C., meaning “Aliens likely to become public charges.” She was finally allowed in to the country, but she hadn’t had family here already, willing to take responsibility for her, she could have been refused and returned to Ireland.

Still more questions! If you look at the second image, you can see it’s from the 1940 US Census. Bridget is on line 59. The image quality isn’t great, but you should be able to make out that she’s an inmate at the New Jersey State Hospital. A “public charge,” indeed. What happened? And where is her son, Patrick. Tracking them both using city directories and censuses, it looks like they were together right up until 1934, then in 1935 she’s an inmate at Greystone Park (AKA New Jersey State Hospital). As far as I can tell, she spent the rest of her life there. She died in 1954 and was buried at Evergreen Cemetery, in Morristown, New Jersey.

I believe Patrick died in 1979. I have no idea what happened to James, nor do I have any idea what happened to break up their family.

So many questions!

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Cute Aggression

Those ears. Bounce bounce bounce. #dogs #boxerdogs #deadofears #cuteaggression

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Every day, every walk, Thomas and his ears bounce along. The cuteness when his ears flippy-flop in unison is almost more than I can stand.

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Don’t Wake the Baby

Very best boy #boxerdogs #dogs #boxerdog

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It’s terrible that he can’t get comfortable.

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Eclipse Viewing

Eclipse Through the Trees #eclipse #eclipse2017 #pinholeleaves

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Eclipse Through the Trees #eclipse #eclipse2017 #pinholeleaves

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I forgot to look for my eclipse glasses, so I was only able to view it indirectly. No complaints, though. Leaves make a lovely pinhole camera.

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